Buckhurst Park wedding photographer

I thought I’d get this blog post up as I’m on the recommended supplier’s list as a Buckhurst Park wedding photographer.

Buckhurst Park wedding photographer

Buckhurst Park is a lovely venue situated in the village of Withyham in East Sussex, midway between Tunbridge Wells and East Grinstead. It’s the ancestral home of the Earl De La Warr and his family.

I photographed Hayley and James’ wedding a couple of years ago and as I was not regularly blogging back then, it never featured. So I thought I’d revisit it and share some images from the day.

I always like going back and looking at whole weddings I photographed from a while ago. My style has evolved over the years, although when I started shooting weddings about ten years ago, I approached the day pretty much the same as I do now. I start with the bridal preparations for about an hour and usually finish around the time of the first dance. I have always preferred to let the day run it’s course without a lot of interference from me – observational, documentary style photography.

One of the things that has changed  over those ten years, is that I tend to shoot wider now. I had come from a sports photography background where the use of long lenses and tight framing is common. This carried over to my wedding work where I would have a 70-200mm lens on one of my camera bodies and would often shoot close-ups of guests and generally get in tighter. The longest lens I use now is my 85mm which stays on my camera all day. I don’t really need anything longer. There aren’t a lot of restrictions with where I can go on a wedding day. It’s not like being behind a goal line at a football match where the action can be anywhere on the pitch. At a wedding I am usually free to roam wherever I like. I only need to keep my distance on certain occasions like shooting the ceremony in a church. This is often photographed from the back of the aisle but the 85mm is usually long enough. You don’t always have to have the couple filling the frame. Keeping in architectural details, stained glass etc give the subjects a sense of ‘placement.’

So, these days, I do tend to use wider lenses more of the time to get more in the frame. I like the action and reaction shots. An image that shows the couple coming into a room is great, but it’s even nicer if you have some of the guests reacting to them coming in, cheering, clapping, just having them there in the picture helps with the storytelling.

Hayley and James had their ceremony at St Michael & All Angels Church in Withyham and then went on to Buckhurst Park for the reception. What I love about the venue is that the outside space is just fantastic for pictures. The gardens were originally designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens and planted with help from Gertrude Jekyll. The views were amazing from the top garden where the marquee was erected, looking out across the park and lake up to Ashdown Forest.

Buckhurst Park wedding photographer

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If you’re thinking of having your wedding here and are looking for a  Buckhurst Park wedding photographer, please get in touch.

I’m a documentary wedding photographer based in Tunbridge Wells, Kent offering reportage coverage of your wedding and I travel anywhere in the UK and overseas.

You can also follow me on Twitter and I will be adding these images to my Facebook Page – once there, feel free to share the images with your Facebook friends.

Lastly, if you like the pictures here, please leave a comment – it would be much appreciated.

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